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You can’t help but draw in your mind whatever you see. As you drive down the street, you wonder how you would paint this tree, what colors you would use, how you would express its texture. As a child, you did not care a bit about Math or English; but when it came to art, you were focused. Attentive. All there. And you loved it.

I was listening in on a conversation between two hairdressers the other day.  They  were going back and forth trying to choose the right hair color for a client. Should they mix this and that color together, or just do high lights with a third color? They were thoroughly enjoying themselves. One of them, Jackie, even closed her eyes, trying to imagine the color on her client’s head. They were so serious about finding just the right combination.  One of them, Jackie, closed her eyes, trying to imagine the color on her client’s head. And my mind had a hard time wrapping itself around this fact: they simply love coloring and cutting hair, making their clients look their best.  And the proof is in the long waiting list they have…

And me, when I feel a strong emotion, I have to write.  I ask myself, “How would I write about this? What would be the best way to draw my reader into it?” I sit down and start jotting my thoughts on paper; three hours later, I have a story and I am happy down to my toes. And you probably look at me and think, “How bizarre!”

And Tony over there, he knows how to count.  Numbers make him gitty with joy.  He can set up a budget like no one else. He looks it over and within minutes he can tell you if something is off, and why.

And Jonathan, he was born to play chess. He is able to see each move through till the end, while Annie can barely take in the whole board, let alone put any kind of  strategy together.

But you should ask Annie about running. She lights up from her hair down to her toes.  See, Annie has been running ever since she can remember, winning race after race, getting faster and faster, and loving every painful minute of it. And when she lost her leg in an awful accident, she worked hard at physical therapy until she was strong enough for the prosthesis, and then she continued the work until she could run again. And she is still winning races.

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You draw, I write. He plays chess, she runs. He loves numbers.

So we’ve got talent(s), inclinations, strong aptitudes… We  are hard-wired that way, down to our very core.  Our gifts are specifically ours, just like our DNA–explicit to each one of us, down to our very fingerprint; God’s mark on our lives.

Eric Liddell, the Olympic runner, said it best: “I believe God made me for a purpose, but He also made me fast, and when I run, I feel God’s pleasure.”  He also said, “To give up running would be to hold Him in contempt.”

And as we assume the responsibility of the talent within, we fulfill our destiny, becoming who He purposed us to be.

And God smiles on us, satisfied with His work.

“God saw all that He had made, and behold, it was very good.” Genesis 1:31

Cultivating Thankfulness with Ann Voskamp

#365 A sunflower on my kitchen table 

#364 My husband stripping the dining room table

#363 A surprise love note from a friend on my windshield

#362 New friends coming over for dinner

Sometimes, I link up with any or all of these wonderful writers: Hearts 4 HomeSDG,  Hearts Reflected, WLW, EOA, Things I can’t say, Growing HomePlay Dates with GodMonday Musings, Hear it on SundayInspire Me Monday, Tell me a Story, The Better Mom, a Mama’s StoryInto the WordIn and Around Mondays,OYHT, Gratituesday, Titus2Tuesdays, ExtraordinayLessons from IvyDenise in BloomSweet BlessingsFaith Filled Friday, Finding Joy

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