To the Younger Version of Me–On Life

Fifty years after they graduated from Harvard Business School, class members of the class of 1963 were asked for their advice on a few topics for the younger generation.

This was an interesting read for me as I am seeing my own thinking change with the pages of the calendar. I don’t think like I did when I was a child, or a teenager or a young mother. And the Harvard graduating Class of 1963’s words left me curious and challenged: what would I tell the younger version of me about these things?

The question would not let me go. So, for whatever they are worth, here are my two cents:

Career

There are only 24 hours in each day, and you will spend probably more than a third of these at work, so seek out a career that makes your heart sing, that causes growth in you and that makes a difference in the great scheme of things.

Marriage

Seek out your partner’s best. Stay interesting. Work at being transparent. Laugh together.

Business

Owning a business is not for everyone.  If you have an itch for it, though, make room for business in your life! Let it scare you, thrill you, grow you, cause you to think outside the box and open the way for philanthropy.

Leadership

Leaders must be listeners who tweak how they lead according to their audience without changing their purpose so that the people they lead can flourish.

Wealth

Wealth is only a lot of fun when it doesn’t own you. Wealth must always be unto something. Unto something much bigger than self-provision and comfort. Unto making a difference in the lives of those who are in need.

Growing Older

We can grow older, but we mustn’t be old. Don’t let the spark, the challenge, the play depart from you. Make that choice every single day. Physically, emotionally, intellectually.

Charity and Spirituality

Nothing makes sense unless God is the driving force of your life. Don’t tweak the truth of the Word of God to fit your mood. It is the only thing that will hold you forever.

Happiness and Success

Success has everything to do with what you say to yourself about yourself. Happiness has everything to do with your attitude in all that you do, from the insignificant to the important.

Turning Points

When my house burned down to the ground in 1994, I lost everything I owned. And then, I realized that I had lost nothing.

Life’s Lessons

Every day is a gift and NOW is what matters. Always. Right now now. Right now tomorrow. Right now as you get older. Fill each day with your Now moments.

And I wonder what the younger version of me would have said about these topics. And I wonder if the younger version of me would have listened to the older one. Probably not.

Cultivating Thankfulness with Ann Voskamp

one-thousand7#895 A mini vacation with dear friends

#896 A quiet evening at home

#897 the joy of writing

Sometimes, I link up with any or all of these wonderful writers: Hearts 4 HomeSDG, Hearts Reflected, WLW, EOA, Things I can’t say, Growing HomePlay Dates with GodMonday Musings, Hear it on Sunday,Inspire Me Monday, Tell me a Story, The Better Mom, a Mama’s StoryInto the WordIn and Around Mondays,OYHT, Gratituesday,Titus2Tuesdays, ExtraordinayLessons from IvyDenise in BloomSweet BlessingsFaith Filled Friday, Finding JoyWholeHearted Home, Mom’s the Word,

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16 comments

  1. Great post! Now you have me really thinking. Biggest lesson – – today is a gift. Live it. Enjoy it. So very true, Barbara. And you are right, I am not sure the younger us would listen. And that would also be something I would tell the younger me – – listen to the older me 🙂 or at least those who are older than me and have more wisdom. Truly a great post! Grateful I was here this morning. Have a wonderful week as you reflect on all that He did for us. Blessings!

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  2. Yeah, my thinking, self-talk, etc etc etc has changed a lot over the years too. My father was a chemical engineer and very good at it. He had a PhD and worked for a defense contractor. It was a great degree for a poor farm kid, and it put food on the table and a roof over our heads – and for that I will always be grateful. It was also not a job that he particularly liked and he was always stressed. He had a stroke and passed away at the age of 47. I am older than that now.

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  3. I was just over on another blog talking about how our perspective/thinking has changed as we’ve grown older. Fun reading your thoughts here, Barbara! God has made you wise.

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  4. Love these words of wisdom! I tremble to think what my younger self would have said in response to these ideas. 🙂 Thankfully, maturity brings insight! Thanks for linking up to Testimony Tuesday, friend!

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  5. I enjoyed your thoughts here … especially that you had not really lost anything when your house burned down and this …We can grow older, but we mustn’t be old.

    Fondly,
    Glenda

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  6. So much wisdom here. When my hard drive crashed, I lost a lot of pictures. But I found myself realizing…it doesn’t really matter. I won’t need pictures in heaven.

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  7. This was beautiful! I completely agree with the marriage bit and the career bit! Especially the laughing together part! We can always use a little reminder about what is important!

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  8. Great post. I’, in my early 30s, but I am surprised how much my thinking has changed since I was younger- and how much it changes from year to year! I often think about the things I would tell me younger self- what an interesting post to write. 🙂

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  9. Oh – I love this! Thank you so much for sharing! I hope you don’t mind if I write a similar ‘letter to my younger self’ on my blog next week – what a great idea!

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  10. Your words are full of God’s grace and wisdom. I wonder what your words would have been 50 years ago. Thank you for sharing your inspiring post with us here at ‘Tell Me a Story.”

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